How interesting: my daughters both thought Adam Raki was so cute they wanted to marry him. They don’t think I’m that cute! That’s probably something to do with me being their mother, but still …

Hot stuff Hugh Dancy acquited himself well: he captured the nervousness and anxiety that comes with Asperger’s, certainly, and the lack of eye contact was pretty accurate, so accurate in fact that I didn’t realise it was accurate until my daughter pointed it out. His chuntering on subjects only of interest to himself reminds me of myself in younger years – after all, post-diagnosis I read a lot and discovered that not everyone shares my interests …

I found myself constantly asking my girls, “Do I do that?!”. And of course they kept saying yes (apart from the rage scene: I’ve never done that in my life, toddler tantrums aside).

The fear of change, the terror of socialisation, the deep courage Adam exhibits in this film as he tries to be “normal” all remind me of myself: I am courageous. All us Aspies are. We are brave on a daily, even hourly basis.

And what I loved most about “Adam” was that he was so lovable. He was totally cute and adorable. He was not an autistic freak – and stated as much in the script – but rather a self-aware, self-managing brave man, who knows his limits and slowly comes to terms with the need for change amid the symptoms of his condition.

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